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what are the haps

Works at Dinosaur Comics Lives in Toronto TOTALLY MARRIED Speaks all of the languages ever Born on October 20th

Posts tagged adventure time.

In my view, the entire purpose of a comic script is to communicate what you’re thinking to your artist!  So anything that supports that will do the trick.  I’ve seen some of Alan Moore’s scripts for Eddie Campbell on From Hell and he’ll have parts where he’s like “Okay this actually won’t show up on the page at all but here’s some cool backstory and here’s where I’m going with this” which I love: the more an artist knows your intentions, the better the two of you can work together.
My scripts are pretty straightforward: usually just a listing of panels, a scene description, and then dialogue, like

Panel 1:
Marceline is standing (well, floating) with her hands on her hips, clearly upset.  In the background zeppelins are crashing out of the sky and into the Candy Kingdom.  Candy citizens are running around, screaming.  Buildings melting like candy, liquid sugar pouring out of water towers, etc.  A candy disaster!
MARCELINE: I thought I said “NO RAPPING ALLOWED”, Jake.  Now look what’s happened!
Panel 2:
We pull back to see that Marcy’s floating behind Jake, who was clearly in the middle of beatboxing, not realizing she was there until just a minute ago.  He’s frozen in place, eyes wide, hands still in front of his mouth.
JAKE: Uh
Panel 3:
Jake turns around to face Marceline and shrugs, smiling weakly.
Panel 4:
Marceline, hugging Jake.
MARCELINE: Aw, I can’t stay mad at you.

A lot of people do scripts differently: some include lots of panel layouts (I generally don’t unless it’s critical, since the artists I work with are AWESOME and always come up with really great ideas), some write it like it’s a screenplay, etc.  There’s no wrong answers here: as long as your script communicates clearly to your artists what you’re talking about, it’s a good comics script.
One final piece of advice is to write out your script, then leave it for a few days and come back and read it again.  If what you read isn’t like what you remember imagining, add whatever detail you need to your script until they match up!

In my view, the entire purpose of a comic script is to communicate what you’re thinking to your artist!  So anything that supports that will do the trick.  I’ve seen some of Alan Moore’s scripts for Eddie Campbell on From Hell and he’ll have parts where he’s like “Okay this actually won’t show up on the page at all but here’s some cool backstory and here’s where I’m going with this” which I love: the more an artist knows your intentions, the better the two of you can work together.

My scripts are pretty straightforward: usually just a listing of panels, a scene description, and then dialogue, like

Panel 1:

Marceline is standing (well, floating) with her hands on her hips, clearly upset.  In the background zeppelins are crashing out of the sky and into the Candy Kingdom.  Candy citizens are running around, screaming.  Buildings melting like candy, liquid sugar pouring out of water towers, etc.  A candy disaster!

MARCELINE: I thought I said “NO RAPPING ALLOWED”, Jake.  Now look what’s happened!

Panel 2:

We pull back to see that Marcy’s floating behind Jake, who was clearly in the middle of beatboxing, not realizing she was there until just a minute ago.  He’s frozen in place, eyes wide, hands still in front of his mouth.

JAKE: Uh

Panel 3:

Jake turns around to face Marceline and shrugs, smiling weakly.

Panel 4:

Marceline, hugging Jake.

MARCELINE: Aw, I can’t stay mad at you.

A lot of people do scripts differently: some include lots of panel layouts (I generally don’t unless it’s critical, since the artists I work with are AWESOME and always come up with really great ideas), some write it like it’s a screenplay, etc.  There’s no wrong answers here: as long as your script communicates clearly to your artists what you’re talking about, it’s a good comics script.

One final piece of advice is to write out your script, then leave it for a few days and come back and read it again.  If what you read isn’t like what you remember imagining, add whatever detail you need to your script until they match up!

In this post: writing  adventure time comics  adventure time  
Multiversity Comics game Adventure Time #30 a really amazing review and called it their pick of the week!  Super rad!

Multiversity Comics game Adventure Time #30 a really amazing review and called it their pick of the week!  Super rad!

ryannorth:

Here is a preview of Adventure Time #30, AKA The Zine Issue, AKA MARCELZINE!

Pictured above:

  • BMO’s adorable submission, “Cool Bear the Bear by BMO the BMO”
  • a page from Marceline’s frankly rad Hourly Comics
  • Princess Bubblegum’s amazing submission, Chicken Experiment Comic

Click through!  THERE’S EVEN MORE COMICS THAT AWAIT YOU

Out today! 

In this post: adventure time  
bradenlamb:

Just wrapped art on Adventure Time 31, in which PB and Marcy are bad role models.

awww yessss

bradenlamb:

Just wrapped art on Adventure Time 31, in which PB and Marcy are bad role models.

awww yessss

In this post: adventure time  

Here is a preview of Adventure Time #30, AKA The Zine Issue, AKA MARCELZINE!

Pictured above:

  • BMO’s adorable submission, “Cool Bear the Bear by BMO the BMO”
  • a page from Marceline’s frankly rad Hourly Comics
  • Princess Bubblegum’s amazing submission, Chicken Experiment Comic

Click through!  THERE’S EVEN MORE COMICS THAT AWAIT YOU

the trials and tribulations of living in Canada and banking with the Bank of Montreal :(

In this post: adventure time  bmo  
comicsalliance:

JIM RUGG’S INSANE ‘ADVENTURE TIME’ RUN CONCLUDES IN NEXT WEEK’S ISSUE #29
By Andy Khouri
Finn and Jake have been on a crazy ride over the last four issues of BOOM! Studios’ Adventure Time series. Courtesy of Eisner-winning series writer Ryan North and visiting artist Jim Rugg, the plucky pair have traversed dark dungeons, confronted mind-body dualism by dying and becoming ghosts, pranked the Ice King, reprogrammed BMO, and been busted by spook hunter Ant-Ghost Princess. Naturally along the way they’ve made some eminently bad calls that have screwed everything up for basically everybody in the Land of Ooo. Also we saw the Mecha Lumpy Space Princess. Finally, this particular saga comes to an end in issue #27, which BOOM! promises will see the intervention of an “unlikely” ally.
Once described by ComicsAlliance writer Dylan Todd as “too good at comics,” Jim Rugg is the creator of critical hits Street Angel or Afrodisiac, and has been meeting and occasionally eclipsing even his own considerably high standards with this run of Adventure Time issues. Synthesizing his clean graphic style with the whimsical models of Pendleton Ward’s animated series, Rugg’s collaboration with North has been super-expressive, technically on point and just really damn funny.
READ A PREVIEW AT COMICS ALLIANCE

In the preview Finn and Jake merge into one being named “Finnenjake”, and you’re just five pages into the comic.

comicsalliance:

JIM RUGG’S INSANE ‘ADVENTURE TIME’ RUN CONCLUDES IN NEXT WEEK’S ISSUE #29

By Andy Khouri

Finn and Jake have been on a crazy ride over the last four issues of BOOM! Studios’ Adventure Time series. Courtesy of Eisner-winning series writer Ryan North and visiting artist Jim Rugg, the plucky pair have traversed dark dungeons, confronted mind-body dualism by dying and becoming ghosts, pranked the Ice King, reprogrammed BMO, and been busted by spook hunter Ant-Ghost Princess. Naturally along the way they’ve made some eminently bad calls that have screwed everything up for basically everybody in the Land of Ooo. Also we saw the Mecha Lumpy Space Princess. Finally, this particular saga comes to an end in issue #27, which BOOM! promises will see the intervention of an “unlikely” ally.

Once described by ComicsAlliance writer Dylan Todd as “too good at comics,” Jim Rugg is the creator of critical hits Street Angel or Afrodisiac, and has been meeting and occasionally eclipsing even his own considerably high standards with this run of Adventure Time issues. Synthesizing his clean graphic style with the whimsical models of Pendleton Ward’s animated series, Rugg’s collaboration with North has been super-expressive, technically on point and just really damn funny.

READ A PREVIEW AT COMICS ALLIANCE

In the preview Finn and Jake merge into one being named “Finnenjake”, and you’re just five pages into the comic.

In this post: adventure time  adventure time comic  
Adventure Time #28 is out today, and you can click those words for a preview!  I don’t want to alarm anyone, but Finn and Jake might be ghosts now, and they might be about to get busted.


You can get the comic at your local comic book store, online, or digitally!
Adventure Time #28 is out today, and you can click those words for a preview! I don’t want to alarm anyone, but Finn and Jake might be ghosts now, and they might be about to get busted.


You can get the comic at your local comic book store, online, or digitally!

In this post: adventure time  adventure time comic  
Adventure Time #27 is out today!  You can read a preview here.  It features:
Finn and Jake as ghosts!
BMO and Ice King on a date!
SHENANIGANS


You can pick up this fine book at your local comic book store, online, or digitally!

Adventure Time #27 is out today! You can read a preview here. It features:

  • Finn and Jake as ghosts!
  • BMO and Ice King on a date!
  • SHENANIGANS
You can pick up this fine book at your local comic book store, online, or digitally!
In this post: adventure time  adventure time comics  

bradenlamb:

Future Finn as he appears in issue 25, and an earlier sketch of same.

I love this!  SO REGAL.

In this post: adventure time  adventure time comics  
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I create a comic called Dinosaur Comics and I a run an awesome network called Project Wonderful and I even have my own Twitter account

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