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what are the haps

Works at Dinosaur Comics Lives in Toronto TOTALLY MARRIED Speaks all of the languages ever Born on October 20th
I just finished Gone Home which is a game that came out yesterday and that you can buy on Steam right now for less than $20 and that is worth every penny.  It’s been getting rave reviews everywhere but I recommend you don’t read them.  I recommend you set aside two hours and play this game instead.
Here’s the premise, briefly: it’s the 90s.  You arrive home from a trip to Europe to find your house empty.  There’s a note on the door and there’s some messages on the answering machine. What happens next - what you find out about what happened - is up to you.  And remarkably, there’s no fighting.  You don’t have to kill anyone.
I’ve complained to friends before that people of my age - gamers - have grown up in a time that allows us to be insanely, ridiculously spoiled.  Games went from Pac-Man to Super Mario Brothers to Doom in under thirteen years. Thirteen years!  And this pace has continued.  I’ve grown up expecting that a great game is not only clever and fun and ingenious - a tall enough order as it is - but also that it shows me something with the medium that has never been done before.  A great game, for me, has to innovate and expand the actual medium of video games itself.  And incredibly, for decades, those expectations have been met.  
Look at the reviews of the greatest games, and you’ll see those reviews mentioning something that game did that nobody else before then ever thought to do.  That’s insane!  That is actually insane.  There’s no other medium like this.  Nobody hands you a novel and says “You’ve got to read this, the author does something with the words on page 352 that simply wasn’t possible twenty years ago.”  But in games, this is routine. We’ve come to expect it.
I’ve been worried that this time of ceaseless innovation is coming to an end: after all, the gigantic leap between Pitfall and Super Mario Brothers 3 (only six years separate those two games!  Imagine the amazing shows we’d be seeing if playwriting advanced this quickly!) was made possible by computers developing as quickly as they did.  Computers are still advancing, obviously, but game development has been trending towards the more complicated, the more expensive, the riskier to produce.  When you’ve got a lot of money on the line, it pays to play it safe.  And I’d think, hey Ryan, perhaps these thirty or so years of explosive creative development are coming to an end.  Perhaps it is, in fact, actually really unfair to expect every great game to alter the medium of gaming itself.  Perhaps, Ryan, a great game can simply be clever and fun and engaging without necessarily needing to show you something you’ve never seen done before.  
Perhaps it’s time you lower your expectations. 
Gone Home shows me those fears were wrong.  There are still new things being invented, and there’s still new ways to play games that we’re just discovering now.
Gone Home: check it out.

I just finished Gone Home which is a game that came out yesterday and that you can buy on Steam right now for less than $20 and that is worth every penny.  It’s been getting rave reviews everywhere but I recommend you don’t read them.  I recommend you set aside two hours and play this game instead.

Here’s the premise, briefly: it’s the 90s.  You arrive home from a trip to Europe to find your house empty.  There’s a note on the door and there’s some messages on the answering machine. What happens next - what you find out about what happened - is up to you.  And remarkably, there’s no fighting.  You don’t have to kill anyone.

I’ve complained to friends before that people of my age - gamers - have grown up in a time that allows us to be insanely, ridiculously spoiled.  Games went from Pac-Man to Super Mario Brothers to Doom in under thirteen years. Thirteen years!  And this pace has continued.  I’ve grown up expecting that a great game is not only clever and fun and ingenious - a tall enough order as it is - but also that it shows me something with the medium that has never been done before.  A great game, for me, has to innovate and expand the actual medium of video games itself.  And incredibly, for decades, those expectations have been met.  

Look at the reviews of the greatest games, and you’ll see those reviews mentioning something that game did that nobody else before then ever thought to do.  That’s insane!  That is actually insane.  There’s no other medium like this.  Nobody hands you a novel and says “You’ve got to read this, the author does something with the words on page 352 that simply wasn’t possible twenty years ago.”  But in games, this is routine. We’ve come to expect it.

I’ve been worried that this time of ceaseless innovation is coming to an end: after all, the gigantic leap between Pitfall and Super Mario Brothers 3 (only six years separate those two games!  Imagine the amazing shows we’d be seeing if playwriting advanced this quickly!) was made possible by computers developing as quickly as they did.  Computers are still advancing, obviously, but game development has been trending towards the more complicated, the more expensive, the riskier to produce.  When you’ve got a lot of money on the line, it pays to play it safe.  And I’d think, hey Ryan, perhaps these thirty or so years of explosive creative development are coming to an end.  Perhaps it is, in fact, actually really unfair to expect every great game to alter the medium of gaming itself.  Perhaps, Ryan, a great game can simply be clever and fun and engaging without necessarily needing to show you something you’ve never seen done before.  

Perhaps it’s time you lower your expectations. 

Gone Home shows me those fears were wrong.  There are still new things being invented, and there’s still new ways to play games that we’re just discovering now.

Gone Home: check it out.

In this post: gone home  reviews  game reviews  
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  10. ragdollratchild reblogged this from josephdreamboatlevitt and added:
    i just discovered steam (i know, i play a lot of flash games) and it has opened so many gaming doors for me. i just...
  11. finalvortex reblogged this from ryannorth and added:
    I’m sure this game is as amazing as Ryan claims, but as a Literature student, I have only one thing to say. "There’s no...
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  14. aeshir reblogged this from ryannorth and added:
    hey losers play this game it’s 20 bux and will run on damn near anything, and it doesn’t have anything reflex based at...
  15. ohgeekygoodness reblogged this from josephdreamboatlevitt
  16. infiniteinanity reblogged this from ryannorth and added:
    I bought this on Mr. North’s recommendation and played it this afternoon. Twenty bucks and two hours VERY well spent.
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I create a comic called Dinosaur Comics and I a run an awesome network called Project Wonderful and I even have my own Twitter account

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